Abba Louisa Goold Woolson Quotes

Abba Louisa Goold Woolson (née Abba Louisa Goold; April 30, 1838 – February 6, 1921) was a 19th-century American writer from Maine. Woolson published several volumes, including: Women in American Society (1873); Dress Reform (1874); Browsing Among Books (1881); and George Eliot and Her Heroines (1887)

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Abba Louisa Goold Woolson


One must always regret that law of growth which renders necessary that kittens should spoil into demure cats, and bright, joyous school-girls develop into the spiritless, crystallized beings denominated young ladies.

Abba Louisa Goold Woolson


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Women overrate the influence of fine dress and the latest fashions upon gentlemen; and certain it is that the very expensiveness of such attire frightens the beholder from all ideas of matrimony.

Abba Louisa Goold Woolson


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The requirements of health, and the style of female attire which custom enjoins, are in direct antagonism to each other.

Abba Louisa Goold Woolson


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Women have in their natures something akin to owls and fireflies. While men grow stupid and sleepy towards evening, they become brighter and more open-eyed, and show a propensity to flit and sparkle under the light of chandeliers.

Abba Louisa Goold Woolson


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A majority of women seem to consider themselves sent into the world for the sole purpose of displaying dry goods, and it is only when acting the part of an animated milliner's block that they feel they are performing their appropriate mission.

Abba Louisa Goold Woolson


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American ladies are known abroad for two distinguishing traits (besides, possibly, their beauty and self-reliance), and these are their ill-health and their extravagant devotion to dress.

Abba Louisa Goold Woolson


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