Adrienne Barbeau Quotes

Adrienne Jo Barbeau (born June 11, 1945) is an American actress, singer and the author of three books. Barbeau came to prominence in the 1970s as Broadway's original Rizzo in the musical Grease, and as Carol Traynor, the divorced daughter of Maude Findlay (played by Bea Arthur) on the sitcom Maude. In the 1970s and 1980s, Barbeau was a sex symbol, and in 1980 began starring in horror and science fiction films, including The Fog, Creepshow, Swamp Thing and Escape from New York. During the 1990s, she became known for providing the voice of Catwoman on Batman: The Animated Series and subsequent Batman cartoon series. In the 2000s, she appeared on the HBO series Carnivàle as Ruthie the snake dancer

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Adrienne Barbeau


I spent years working in low-budget horror films. When you've done 'Cannibal Women in the Avocado Jungle of Death,' you can handle anything!

Adrienne Barbeau


I'm a short woman with a pretty good body and large breasts â?? that's not what I think of as sexy.

Adrienne Barbeau


When I see myself on film it makes me smile, I mean making a good living doing what I enjoy is soo much fun. I just hope that everyone has the chance to enjoy life like I do.

Adrienne Barbeau


“Those who say, 'Well, she was just a drunk,' will get an understanding of what her demons were, what drove her and why she was the way she was.”

Adrienne Barbeau


“I'm not doing an impersonation. I think of it as a representation of her, an impression instead of an impersonation.”

Adrienne Barbeau


“When I see myself on film it makes me smile, I mean making a good living doing what I enjoy is soo much fun. I just hope that everyone has the chance to enjoy life like I do.”

Adrienne Barbeau


In all the horror films that I have done, all of those women were strong women. I don't feel I ever played the victim, although I was always in jeopardy.

Adrienne Barbeau


But when I think of superchicks, I think of the roles, not the variety.

Adrienne Barbeau


It's not easy, though, singing upside down in a headstand on a raised platform with your unfettered breasts hitting you in the chin.

Adrienne Barbeau


“The last time I was on stage in New York was in 1972, downtown at the Eden Theatre in Grease .”

Adrienne Barbeau