Fanny Fern Quotes

Fanny Fern, born Sara Willis (July 9, 1811 – October 10, 1872), was an American newspaper columnist, humorist, novelist, and author of children's stories in the 1850s-1870s. Fern's great popularity has been attributed to her conversational style and sense of what mattered to her mostly middle-class female readers. By 1855, Fern was the highest-paid columnist in the United States, commanding $100 per week for her New York Ledger column.

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Fanny Fern


Hurry, drive and bustle ... Everybody looking out for number one, and caring little who jostled past, if their rights were not infringed.

Fanny Fern


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To the Pilgrim Mothers, who not only had their full share of the hardships and privations of pioneer life but also had the Pilgrim Fathers to endure.

Fanny Fern


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O, girls! set your affections on cats, poodles, parrots or lap-dogs; but let matrimony alone. It's the hardest way on earth to getting a living.

Fanny Fern


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Hotel life is about the same in every latitude.

Fanny Fern


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Never ask a favor until you are drawing your last breath; and never forget one.

Fanny Fern


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There are so many ready to write (poor fools!) for the honor and glory of the thing, and there are so many ready to take advantage of this fact, and withhold from needy talent the moral right to a deserved remuneration.

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Why don't men ... leave off those detestable stiff collars, stocks, and things, that make them all look like choked chickens, and which hide so many handsomely-turned throats, that a body never sees, unless a body is married, or unless a body happens to see a body's brothers while they are shaving.

Fanny Fern


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How strong sometimes is weakness!

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The term 'lady' has been so misused, that I like better the old-fashioned term, woman.

Fanny Fern


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I am convinced that there are times in everybody's experience when there is so much to be done, that the only way to do it is to sit down and do nothing.

Fanny Fern


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Uncles and aunts, and cousins, are all very well, and fathers and mothers are not to be despised; but a grandmother, at holiday time, is worth them all.

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Too much indulgence has ruined thousands of children; too much love not one.

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Nowhere more than in New York does the contest between squalor and splendor so sharply present itself.

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Would a harsh word ever fall from lips which now breathed only love? Would the step whose lightest footfall now made her heart leap, ever sound in her ear like a death knell?

Fanny Fern


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Show me an 'easy person,' and I will show you a selfish one. Good-natured he may be; why not? since the disastrous consequences of his 'easiness' are generally shouldered by other people.

Fanny Fern


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